Where did the name come from?

There are many theories on where the name Deyermond came from. For years I've heard we came from France but there is no evidence of that so far that I can corroborate. There is a site from Scotland that notes that the name came from old hill tribes of Ireland. There are numerous variations of the name and this spelling seems to be a pretty unique one. It's earliest use so far that I've found is in the US and Canada in the early 1700s although the families were all from Ireland. DNA from those that have had it done point to Ireland, so "following the science" seems to disprove the French Huguenot theory although nothing can be absolutely ruled out. Then we come to the spelling and as to that, since illiteracy was the norm until the last 100 years or so, the challenge is much greater and we may ever know for sure what the original spelling was. But for now, one thing that you can be sure of, is if you have this last name and meet someone else with it; you are definitely related.

Names in this tree

There are a lot of names in this tree and some of the last names are here: DEYERMOND, ELDRED, GOLDEN, BAKER, ANDERSON, DAVIS, NICOLL, DUSHAME, CORCORAN, KEITH, DEYERMAND, SHORTEN, COULTER, SULLIVAN, WILLIAMS, BATESON, CALDWELL, CUNNINGHAM, GORRIE, HANNA, KEHOE, KNAPP, COWARD, MURPHY, POSCHEN, SMITH, SPELMAN, DEYERMON, FARRINGTON, MURRAY, ROE, O'DONNELL, ROLLINS, BLACK, HENDRICK, MOONEY, NORTON, ABBOT, BAXTER and DWYER among many others. These are just the surnames with the most people.

Anyone can request access to this site however it is not a public site, so please be aware that if we cannot verify you are family, access may not be granted.

More

The Bones of My Bones

The bones here are bones of my bone and flesh of my flesh. It goes to doing something about it. It goes to pride in what our ancestors were able to accomplish. How they contributed to what we are today. It goes to respecting their hardships and losses, their never giving in or giving up, their resoluteness to go on and build a life for their family. It goes to deep pride that the fathers fought and some died to make and keep us a nation. It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. It is of equal pride and love that our mothers struggled to give us birth, without them we could not exist, and so we love each one, as far back as we can reach. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are they and they are the sum of who we are. So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take my place in the long line of family storytellers. That is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and restore the memory or greet those who we had never known before. "It goes to a deep and immense understanding that they were doing it for us. It is of equal pride and love that our mothers struggled to give us birth, without them we could not exist, and so we love each one, as far back as we can reach. That we might be born who we are. That we might remember them. So we do. With love and caring and scribing each fact of their existence, because we are they and they are the sum of who we are. So, as a scribe called, I tell the story of my family. It is up to that one called in the next generation to answer the call and take my place in the long line of family storytellers. That is why I do my family genealogy, and that is what calls those young and old to step up and restore the memory or greet those who we had never known before."by Della M. Cummings Wright; Rewritten by her granddaughter Dell Jo Ann McGinnis Johnson; Edited and Reworded by Tom Dunn, 1943.

Spotlight on Ancestors

Francis J. Hughes

Frank Hughes served in both WWI & WWII. He was swept overboard on his way to France in WWI but was rescued without harm. Frank married Lillian Corcoran in 1920 and they had 2 children. Frank and his wife are buried in Arlington National Cemetery.

William Coulter

William Coulter, a yarn bundler, and his family lived at 77 Tea Lane in Belfast for about 20 years. William & his wife, Sarah Collins, lost 2 sons named William while here. The thought of 8 people living in a 2 bedroom house is hard to contemplate. These homes are now a museum.

More

Enjoy the Humor!
  • Why waste your money looking up your family tree? Just go into politics and your opponents will do it for you.
    ~ Mark Twain
  • Everyone has ancestors and it is only a question of going back far enough to find a good one.
    ~ Howard K. Nixon
  • We've uncovered some embarrassing ancestors in the not-too-distant past. Some horse thieves, and some people killed on Saturday nights. One of my relatives, unfortunately, was even in the newspaper business.
    ~ Jimmy Carter
  • Southerners are so devoted to genealogy that we see a family tree under every bush.
    ~ Florence King
  • My grandmother started walking five miles a day when she was sixty. She's ninety-seven now, and we don't know where the hell she is.
    ~ Ellen

Our Families

John Deyermond

Married Martha Eldred in 1914 and they had 7 children together. John was on quite a few town sports teams from 1909 to about 1939. He served on the police department for over 25 years.

Robert V. Deyermond

In 1920 Robert married Gladys Napier and they had 4 children Robert was a prolific writer who frequently wrote letters that were published in area newspapers. His daughter Mary told he he would spend hours writing at the kitchen table in his retirement.

William Deyermond

William married Janet Caldwell in 1915 and they had 3 daughters. William was the last one in his family to arrive from Belfast. He was a captain of the local soccer team at the time of his marriage.

James A. Deyermond

Add text that you've found interesting on the above ancestor.

Henry Deyermond

Add text that you've found interesting on the above ancestor.



Webmaster Message

We strive to document all of our sources in this family tree. If you have something to add, please let us know. And I am always interested in exchanging family information and obtaining family items. I once found my great grandfathers badges through an ebay listing!